Name  _____________________________________ Teacher _______________________ Period ______

                         (First & Last Name)

7th Grade Agenda

Cascade Middle School

Distance Learning Opportunities

April 20 - April 24

RETURN TO CMS OR ANY LUNCH PICK-UP LOCATION ON MONDAY, APRIL 27TH

Subject

Math

Writing and Solving Two-Step Equation word problems--complete the questions from the packet and the quiz. Be sure to WRITE and SOLVE your equation, and indicate what the variable stands for in the problem.

Can also be done online at:   https://swsd.instructure.com/     

Accelerated

7th Grade Math  

 https://swsd.instructure.com/      OR in text

Complete Quizzes on Canvas for 8-4, 8-5, 8-6, OR do the equivalent--pg.  827 EVENS to turn in (take a photo, send it to me, or return with packet). Do the “Check Your Progress” problems with the examples.

Lesson 8-7  Slope Intercept Form p. 435-438 (1-35)

Lesson 8-8  Writing Linear Equations p. 444-445 (1-38)

**Check your answers in the back of the book**

English

- Read the short story, "The Monkey's Paw" in the packet or in your teacher's Canvas or Google Classroom.

- Do the "Monkey's Paw" assignment, answering all four of the Close Reading questions and choosing one of the Writing questions. Submit your work either in the paper packet OR on Canvas or Google Classroom.

Science

Complete a Final Model of the provided Weather Phenomena

Social Studies

  • What would you fight for? Paragraph response to prompt
  • Read pages 84-87 of the textbook and complete the What Did You Learn? Questions at the end.

Wellness

Daily PE Workouts & Physical Activity Log

● Students who DO NOT have access to the internet and Canvas

will complete workouts, daily physical activity logs and health

assignments included in this packet.

● Students who DO have access to the internet and Canvas can

complete daily workouts, physical activity logs, and health

assignments on Canvas.  https://swsd.instructure.com/

HighCap

ELA: Begin drafting your Dystopian Story. Follow directions on the Google Classroom assignment.

Social Studies: Check out our two new modules on current events and April 20-24.  Current events are optional each day of the week. Now is the time to start reading Call of the Klondike or Call of the Wild at your own pace. This is optional. Mandatory: Read and complete the questions on Canvas on Treaty Making in Washington. Optional Zoom meeting on Tuesday, April 21st at 1:30.

SPED

Wing    https://swsd.instructure.com

If you don’t have access to the internet, return this form stating that and we will send you a packet.

CMS Library

Take a Library Break! Visit our library’s website for lots of activities including eBook/audiobook access, trivia games, STEAM challenges, digital escape rooms, digital citizenship tips, and virtual tours & webcams. The direct link to the site is CMS Library Home Page. I’ll post new activities online each Monday and include printables in the paper packets as well.

Returning Library Books: If you have library books to return for any Sedro-Woolley school, there will be a library book collection box next to the packet boxes in front of Cascade Middle School every Monday from 7:30 am to 2:30 pm. Please DO NOT put your books in the packet boxes! If the day and times do not work for your family please email me, mhuggins@swsd101.org, or call 360-855-3071. Thank you!

Electives

  • Art
  • AVID
  • Music
  • Technology
  • Band
  • Choir
  • Orchestra
  • Counseling

ART: PREPOSTEROUS CROSSLINK

  • Please complete your 4 sketches and final draft.
  • When finished, drop off at the school or email me a photo or PDF of your completed work.

Choir:

  • Complete the listening journal for this week
  • Music theory: Complete worksheet 4 (bass clef) and  worksheet 5 (note reading)

All Music:

  • Music Listening Journal April 20-24

Band and Orchestra:

  • Music Theory Worksheet 18 and Worksheet 19
  • Band Smart Music: the solo recently assigned to you
  • Orchestra Smart Music:  #125 and #126 Essential Elements Book 2

AVID:  

Counseling Activities:

https://sites.google.com/swsd101.org/cms-counseling-center/home?authuser=0

 

Math & Accelerated Math

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Mrs. Rose:

erose@swsd101.org

or

*Use Discussion tab on Canvas to ask questions

Mon-Fri  9:00-10:00, but

email any time and I’ll do my best to get back to you within the hour during school hours

Ms. Backstrom:

mbackstrom@swsd101.org

or

*Use Discussion tab on Canvas to ask questions

M-F 9:00am-10:00am, but email anytime and I’ll do my best to get back to you as soon as possible during school hours.

Mr. Thompson:

dathompson@swsd101.org

or

*Use Discussion tab on Canvas to ask questions

M-F 10-11 & 1:30-2:30

Zoom Meetings: 

T-F 9-9:30am ID:4610648195

Password:1143044

Mrs. Pittis:

rpittis@swsd101.org

Mon-Fri 9AM-10AM but email me anytime and I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.






Math--Week 3 Answer Key

8-2 (pg. 127)

1. d = 1

3. s = 5

5. p = -2

7. c = 4

9. r = -16

11. m = 4

13. a = 18

15. v = 20

(pg. 128)

1. g = 4

3. m = 3

5. k = -2

7. z = 6

9. y = -9

11. y = 15

13. d = -10

15. m = 3

17. s = -4

19. y = 2

21. v = -10

23. z = -26

25. b = 5 flower baskets

27. 12 + y + 3y = 28; y = 4

8-3 (pg. 129)

1. 2x + 5 = 7; x = 1

2. 3x + 14 = 2; x = -4

3. 2x - 7 = 5; x = 6

4. 4x + 2 = -10; x = -3

5. 3x - 8 = -14; x = -2

6. ; x = 8

(pg. 130)

1. 8x + 3 = 19

2. 7x - 12 = 16

3. 2x + 4 = -10

4. 5x - 9 = -30

5. 8x + 6.95 = 24.95; x = cost per paint tube

x = $2.25

6. x + x + 35 = 635; x - height of Nurek Dam

        x = 300 meters

7. 2(69) - x = 45; He was 93 years old

8. ; He was 64 years old

9. 2x + 36 = 180; x = 72 degrees

10. n + n +1 + n + 2 = 57;  3n + 3 = 57;

        n = 18; integers: 18, 19, 20

CPM Chapter 6 5-D WS

WEEK 3: Two-Step Equations QUIZ

Circle the answer that best fits. Show any work necessary.

Question 1:

Solve the equation.

                           

a.     x = 3                          b.    x = -8

c.     x = 5                          d.    x = 4

Question 2:

Solve the equation.

                           

a.    x = 13                            b.   x = 3

c.    x = -28                           d.   x = -2

Question 3:

Solve the equation.

                           

a.   x = 10                             b.   x = 7

c.   x = 4                               d.   x = 2

Question 4:

Solve the equation.

                           

a.    x = 2                             b.    x = -3

c.    x = 3                             d.    x = -2

Question 5:

331 students went on a field trip. Six buses were filled and 7 students traveled in cars.

How many students were in each bus?        

a.    x = 53                                b.   x = 56

c.    x = 57                                d.    x = 54

Question 6:

Jill bought a magazine for $3 and some candy bars for $2 each. Jill spent a total of $19.

How many candy bars did Jill buy?

a.    x = 8                                b.    x = 4

c.    x = 1                                d.    x = 11

Question 7:

Solve.

                     

a.   4                             b.   132

c.   -30                          d.   -4

Question 8:

Solve.

                           

a.  3                                  b. 6

c.  -27                               d.  -3

English

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Mr. Walcon

awalcon@swsd101.org

M-F 8-9 am

Mr. Dorman

tdorman@swsd101.org

M-F 10-11 am

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.


English 7 and 8 Assignment: W. W. Jacobs, "The Monkey's Paw"

This is another deceivingly difficult story, but the CMS 8th-graders have so far done an admirable job of plunging into assignments, thinking carefully, and taking intellectual risks. Let's keep this trend of academic independence going.

        This week's story can be read in the packet, read on Canvas or Google Classroom, or listened to on video. Because it is such a famous story, there are tons of informational websites which can help you with your reading of it.

        "The Monkey's Paw" is, like Aladdin's Lamp, a Three Wishes story, but with an ominous twist, as indicated by the epigram of the story: "Be careful what you wish for; you may receive it." It is an object lesson in what happens if people attempt to play with the power of fate.

1. Read the story carefully, and don't forget to enjoy it.

2. Answer the Close Reading Questions. Last week, we did a good job of this, but quite a few people forgot Rule #1 in answering school questions: Always answer with at least a complete sentence. If it helps you to re-state the question in order to create a complete sentence, by all means, do so.

3. Choose one of the Short Writing questions, and answer it. For the most part last week, students remembered the parts of the Framework Paragraph and included them in their paragraph.

Close Reading Questions. Keep in mind that these are not easy questions, so your job is to keep your cool and do your brave and independent best. Answer all four questions.

a. When Mr. White finds out about the painful death of his only son, he is able to stay calm--though, of course, he is very saddened. But then, when he finds out that his son's employer is going to give the family 200 pounds, he faints: he fell "a senseless heap, to the floor." Why does he have a much stronger reaction to the money than to the death?

b. Toward the end of the story, Mrs. White suddenly remembers something important: "'I forgot it was two miles away.'" What does the word it refer to in this sentence? (For 8th-graders, we can ask, "What is the antecedent for it?")

c. At the very end of the story, Mr. White is desperately trying to find the monkey's paw for the final wish. What is his wish?

d. If Mr. White had not managed to make his third wish, what would Mrs. White have seen when she opened the door? Describe it and explain how you know.

Short Writing Questions. Choose one.

a. In a Framework Paragraph with one or two pieces of textual evidence, explain what the story is trying to say about those people who try to change what fate has given them.

b. In the style of the story, write a new ending based on your answer to letter d above. Include description and dialogue.

c. If you had the monkey's paw, what would you do with it? Write a nice, complete paragraph. You do not have to quote from the story for this question, but you do have to refer to the story, in addition to your own imaginary experience with the paw.


_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

The Monkey's Paw

W. W. Jacobs

1902

"Be careful what you wish for; you may receive it." --Anonymous

Part I

Without, the night was cold and wet, but in the small parlour of Laburnum villa the blinds were drawn and the fire burned brightly. Father and son were at chess; the former, who possessed ideas about the game involving radical chances, putting his king into such sharp and unnecessary perils that it even provoked comment from the white-haired old lady knitting placidly by the fire.

"Hark at the wind," said Mr. White, who, having seen a fatal mistake after it was too late, was amiably desirous of preventing his son from seeing it.

"I'm listening," said the latter grimly surveying the board as he stretched out his hand. "Check."

"I should hardly think that he's come tonight, " said his father, with his hand poised over the board.

"Checkmate," replied the son.

"That's the worst of living so far out," bawled Mr. White with sudden and unlooked-for violence; "Of all the beastly, slushy, out of the way places to live in, this is the worst. Path's a bog, and the road's a torrent. I don't know what people are thinking about. I suppose because only two houses in the road are let, they think it doesn't matter."

"Never mind, dear," said his wife soothingly; "perhaps you'll win the next one."

Mr. White looked up sharply, just in time to intercept a knowing glance between mother and son. the words died away on his lips, and he hid a guilty grin in his thin grey beard.

"There he is," said Herbert White as the gate banged to loudly and heavy footsteps came toward the door.

The old man rose with hospitable haste and opening the door, was heard condoling with the new arrival. The new arrival also condoled with himself, so that Mrs. White said, "Tut, tut!" and coughed gently as her husband entered the room followed by a tall, burly man, beady of eye and rubicund of visage.

"Sergeant-Major Morris, " he said, introducing him.

The Sergeant-Major took hands and taking the proffered seat by the fire, watched contentedly as his host got out whiskey and tumblers and stood a small copper kettle on the fire.

At the third glass his eyes got brighter, and he began to talk, the little family circle regarding with eager interest this visitor from distant parts, as he squared his broad shoulders in the chair and spoke of wild scenes and doughty deeds; of wars and plagues and strange peoples.

"Twenty-one years of it," said Mr. White, nodding at his wife and son. "When he went away he was a slip of a youth in the warehouse. Now look at him."

"He don't look to have taken much harm." said Mrs. White politely.

"I'd like to go to India myself," said the old man, just to look around a bit, you know."

"Better where you are," said the Sergeant-Major, shaking his head. He put down the empty glass and sighing softly, shook it again.

"I should like to see those old temples and fakirs and jugglers," said the old man. "what was that that you started telling me the other day about a monkey's paw or something, Morris?"

"Nothing." said the soldier hastily. "Leastways, nothing worth hearing."

"Monkey's paw?" said Mrs. White curiously.

"Well, it's just a bit of what you might call magic, perhaps." said the Sergeant-Major off-handedly.

His three listeners leaned forward eagerly. The visitor absent-mindedly put his empty glass to his lips and then set it down again. His host filled it for him again.

"To look at," said the Sergeant-Major, fumbling in his pocket, "it's just an ordinary little paw, dried to a mummy."

He took something out of his pocket and proffered it. Mrs. White drew back with a grimace, but her son, taking it, examined it curiously.

"And what is there special about it?" inquired Mr. White as he took it from his son, and having examined it, placed it upon the table.

"It had a spell put on it by an old Fakir," said the Sergeant-Major, "a very holy man. He wanted to show that fate ruled people's lives, and that those who interfered with it did so to their sorrow. He put a spell on it so that three separate men could each have three wishes from it."

His manners were so impressive that his hearers were conscious that their light laughter had jarred somewhat.

"Well, why don't you have three, sir?" said Herbert White cleverly.

The soldier regarded him the way that middle age is wont to regard presumptuous youth."I have," he said quietly, and his blotchy face whitened.

"And did you really have the three wishes granted?" asked Mrs. White.

"I did," said the sergeant-major, and his glass tapped against his strong teeth.

"And has anybody else wished?" persisted the old lady.

"The first man had his three wishes. Yes," was the reply, "I don't know what the first two were, but the third was for death. That's how I got the paw."

His tones were so grave that a hush fell upon the group.

"If you've had your three wishes it's no good to you now then Morris," said the old man at last. "What do you keep it for?"

The soldier shook his head. "Fancy I suppose," he said slowly. "I did have some idea of selling it, but I don't think I will. It has caused me enough mischief already. Besides, people won't buy. They think it's a fairy tale, some of them; and those who do think anything of it want to try it first and pay me afterward."

"If you could have another three wishes," said the old man, eyeing him keenly," would you have them?"

"I don't know," said the other. "I don't know."

He took the paw, and dangling it between his forefinger and thumb, suddenly threw it upon the fire. White, with a slight cry, stooped down and snatched it off.

"Better let it burn," said the soldier solemnly.

"If you don't want it Morris," said the other, "give it to me."

"I won't." said his friend doggedly. "I threw it on the fire. If you keep it, don't blame me for what happens. Pitch it on the fire like a sensible man."

The other shook his head and examined his possession closely. "How do you do it?" he inquired.

"Hold it up in your right hand, and wish aloud," said the Sergeant-Major, "But I warn you of the consequences."

"Sounds like the 'Arabian Nights'", said Mrs. White, as she rose and began to set the supper. "Don't you think you might wish for four pairs of hands for me."

Her husband drew the talisman from his pocket, and all three burst into laughter as the Sergeant-Major, with a look of alarm on his face, caught him by the arm.

"If you must wish," he said gruffly, "Wish for something sensible."

Mr. White dropped it back in his pocket, and placing chairs, motioned his friend to the table. In the business of supper the talisman was partly forgotten, and afterward the three sat listening in an enthralled fashion to a second installment of the soldier's adventures in India.

"If the tale about the monkey's paw is not more truthful than those he has been telling us," said Herbert, as the door closed behind their guest, just in time to catch the last train, "we shan't make much out of it."

"Did you give anything for it, father?" inquired Mrs. White, regarding her husband closely.

"A trifle," said he, colouring slightly, "He didn't want it, but I made him take it. And he pressed me again to throw it away."

"Likely," said Herbert, with pretended horror. "Why, we're going to be rich, and famous, and happy. Wish to be an emperor, father, to begin with; then you can't be henpecked."

He darted around the table, pursued by the maligned Mrs White armed with an antimacassar.

Mr. White took the paw from his pocket and eyed it dubiously. "I don't know what to wish for, and that's a fact," he said slowly. It seems to me I've got all I want."

"If you only cleared the house, you'd be quite happy, wouldn't you!" said Herbert, with his hand on his shoulder. "Well, wish for two hundred pounds, then; that'll just do it."

His father, smiling shamefacedly at his own credulity, held up the talisman, as his son, with a solemn face, somewhat marred by a wink at his mother, sat down and struck a few impressive chords.

"I wish for two hundred pounds," said the old man distinctly.

A fine crash from the piano greeted his words, interrupted by a shuddering cry from the old man. His wife and son ran toward him.

"It moved," he cried, with a glance of disgust at the object as it lay on the floor. "As I wished, it twisted in my hand like a snake."

"Well, I don't see the money," said his son, as he picked it up and placed it on the table, "and I bet I never shall."

"It must have been your fancy, father," said his wife, regarding him anxiously.

He shook his head. "Never mind, though; there's no harm done, but it gave me a shock all the same."

They sat down by the fire again while the two men finished their pipes. Outside, the wind was higher than ever, and the old man started nervously at the sound of a door banging upstairs. A silence unusual and depressing settled on all three, which lasted until the old couple rose to retire for the rest of the night.

"I expect you'll find the cash tied up in a big bag in the middle of your bed," said Herbert, as he bade them good night, " and something horrible squatting on top of your wardrobe watching you as you pocket your ill-gotten gains."

He sat alone in the darkness, gazing at the dying fire, and seeing faces in it. The last was so horrible and so simian that he gazed at it in amazement. It got so vivid that, with a little uneasy laugh, he felt on the table for a glass containing a little water to throw over it. His hand grasped the monkey's paw, and with a little shiver he wiped his hand on his coat and went up to bed.

Part II

In the brightness of the wintry sun next morning as it streamed over the breakfast table he laughed at his fears. There was an air of prosaic wholesomeness about the room which it had lacked on the previous night, and the dirty, shriveled little paw was pitched on the side-board with a carelessness which betokened no great belief in its virtues.

"I suppose all old soldiers are the same," said Mrs White. "The idea of our listening to such nonsense! How could wishes be granted in these days? And if they could, how could two hundred pounds hurt you, father?"

"Might drop on his head from the sky," said the frivolous Herbert.

"Morris said the things happened so naturally," said his father, "that you might if you so wished attribute it to coincidence."

"Well, don't break into the money before I come back," said Herbert as he rose from the table. "I'm afraid it'll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you."

His mother laughed, and following him to the door, watched him down the road; and returning to the breakfast table, was very happy at the expense of her husband's credulity. All of which did not prevent her from scurrying to the door at the postman's knock, nor prevent her from referring somewhat shortly to retired Sergeant-Majors of bibulous habits when she found that the post brought a tailor's bill.

"Herbert will have some more of his funny remarks, I expect, when he comes home," she said as they sat at dinner.

"I dare say," said Mr. White, pouring himself out some beer; "but for all that, the thing moved in my hand; that I'll swear to."

"You thought it did," said the old lady soothingly.

"I say it did," replied the other. "There was no thought about it; I had just - What's the matter?"

His wife made no reply. She was watching the mysterious movements of a man outside, who, peering in an undecided fashion at the house, appeared to be trying to make up his mind to enter. In mental connection with the two hundred pounds, she noticed that the stranger was well dressed, and wore a silk hat of glossy newness. Three times he paused at the gate, and then walked on again. The fourth time he stood with his hand upon it, and then with sudden resolution flung it open and walked up the path. Mrs White at the same moment placed her hands behind her, and hurriedly unfastening the strings of her apron, put that useful article of apparel beneath the cushion of her chair.

She brought the stranger, who seemed ill at ease, into the room. He gazed at her furtively, and listened in a preoccupied fashion as the old lady apologized for the appearance of the room, and her husband's coat, a garment which he usually reserved for the garden. She then waited as patiently as her sex would permit for him to broach his business, but he was at first strangely silent.

"I -- was asked to call," he said at last, and stooped and picked a piece of cotton from his trousers. "I come from 'Maw and Meggins.' "

The old lady started. "Is anything the matter?" she asked breathlessly. "Has anything happened to Herbert? What is it? What is it?

Her husband interposed. "There, there, mother," he said hastily. "Sit down, and don't jump to conclusions. You've not brought bad news, I'm sure sir," and eyed the other wistfully.

"I'm sorry - " began the visitor.

"Is he hurt?" demanded the mother wildly.

The visitor bowed in assent."Badly hurt," he said quietly, "but he is not in any pain."

"Oh thank God!" said the old woman, clasping her hands. "Thank God for that! Thank - "

She broke off as the sinister meaning of the assurance dawned on her and she saw the awful confirmation of her fears in the other's averted face. She caught her breath, and turning to her slower-witted husband, laid her trembling hand on his. There was a long silence.

"He was caught in the machinery," said the visitor at length in a low voice.

"Caught in the machinery," repeated Mr. White, in a dazed fashion,"yes."

He sat staring out the window, and taking his wife's hand between his own, pressed it as he had been wont to do in their old courting days nearly forty years before.

"He was the only one left to us," he said, turning gently to the visitor. "It is hard."

The other coughed, and rising, walked slowly to the window. "The firm wishes me to convey their sincere sympathy with you in your great loss," he said, without looking round. "I beg that you will understand I am only their servant and merely obeying orders."

There was no reply; the old woman’s face was white, her eyes staring, and her breath inaudible; on the husband's face was a look such as his friend the sergeant might have carried into his first action.

"I was to say that Maw and Meggins disclaim all responsibility," continued the other. "They admit no liability at all, but in consideration of your son's services, they wish to present you with a certain sum as compensation."

Mr. White dropped his wife's hand, and rising to his feet, gazed with a look of horror at his visitor. His dry lips shaped the words, "How much?"

"Two hundred pounds," was the answer.

Unconscious of his wife's shriek, the old man smiled faintly, put out his hands like a sightless man, and dropped, a senseless heap, to the floor.

Part III

In the huge new cemetery, some two miles distant, the old people buried their dead, and came back to the house steeped in shadows and silence. It was all over so quickly that at first they could hardly realize it, and remained in a state of expectation as though of something else to happen -- something else which was to lighten this load, too heavy for old hearts to bear.

But the days passed, and expectations gave way to resignation -- the hopeless resignation of the old, sometimes mis-called apathy. Sometimes they hardly exchanged a word, for now they had nothing to talk about, and their days were long to weariness.

It was about a week after that the old man, waking suddenly in the night, stretched out his hand and found himself alone. The room was in darkness, and the sound of subdued weeping came from the window. He raised himself in bed and listened.

"Come back," he said tenderly. "You will be cold."

"It is colder for my son," said the old woman, and wept afresh.

The sounds of her sobs died away on his ears. The bed was warm, and his eyes heavy with sleep. He dozed fitfully, and then slept until a sudden wild cry from his wife awoke him with a start.

"The paw!" she cried wildly. "The monkey's paw!"

He started up in alarm. "Where? Where is it? What’s the matter?"

She came stumbling across the room toward him. "I want it," she said quietly. "You've not destroyed it?"

"It's in the parlour, on the bracket," he replied, marveling. "Why?"

She cried and laughed together, and bending over, kissed his cheek.

"I only just thought of it," she said hysterically. "Why didn't I think of it before? Why didn't you think of it?"

"Think of what?" he questioned.

"The other two wishes," she replied rapidly. "We've only had one."

"Was not that enough?" he demanded fiercely.

"No," she cried triumphantly; "We'll have one more. Go down and get it quickly, and wish our boy alive again."

The man sat in bed and flung the bedclothes from his quaking limbs."Good God, you are mad!" he cried aghast.

"Get it," she panted; "get it quickly, and wish -- Oh my boy, my boy!"

Her husband struck a match and lit the candle. "Get back to bed," he said unsteadily. "You don't know what you are saying."

"We had the first wish granted," said the old woman, feverishly; "why not the second?"

"A coincidence," stammered the old man.

"Go get it and wish," cried his wife, quivering with excitement.

The old man turned and regarded her, and his voice shook. "He has been dead ten days, and besides he -- I would not tell you else, but -- I could only recognize him by his clothing. If he was too terrible for you to see then, how now?"

"Bring him back," cried the old woman, and dragged him towards the door. "Do you think I fear the child I have nursed?"

He went down in the darkness, and felt his way to the parlour, and then to the mantlepiece. The talisman was in its place, and a horrible fear that the unspoken wish might bring his mutilated son before him ere he could escape from the room seized up on him, and he caught his breath as he found that he had lost the direction of the door. His brow cold with sweat, he felt his way round the table, and groped along the wall until he found himself in the small passage with the unwholesome thing in his hand.

Even his wife's face seemed changed as he entered the room. It was white and expectant, and to his fears seemed to have an unnatural look upon it. He was afraid of her.

"WISH!" she cried in a strong voice.

"It is foolish and wicked," he faltered.

"WISH!" repeated his wife.

He raised his hand. "I wish my son alive again."

The talisman fell to the floor, and he regarded it fearfully. Then he sank trembling into a chair as the old woman, with burning eyes, walked to the window and raised the blind.

He sat until he was chilled with the cold, glancing occasionally at the figure of the old woman peering through the window. The candle-end, which had burned below the rim of the china candlestick, was throwing pulsating shadows on the ceiling and walls, until with a flicker larger than the rest, it expired. The old man, with an unspeakable sense of relief at the failure of the talisman, crept back to his bed, and a minute afterward the old woman came silently and apathetically beside him.

Neither spoke, but sat silently listening to the ticking of the clock. A stair creaked, and a squeaky mouse scurried noisily through the wall. The darkness was oppressive, and after lying for some time screwing up his courage, he took the box of matches, and striking one, went downstairs for a candle.

At the foot of the stairs the match went out, and he paused to strike another; and at the same moment a knock, so quiet and stealthy as to be scarcely audible, sounded on the front door.

The matches fell from his hand and spilled in the passage. He stood motionless, his breath suspended until the knock was repeated. Then he turned and fled swiftly back to his room, and closed the door behind him. A third knock sounded through the house.

"What's that?" cried the old woman, starting up.

"A rat," said the old man in shaking tones -- "a rat. It passed me on the stairs."

His wife sat up in bed listening. A loud knock resounded through the house.

"It's Herbert!"

She ran to the door, but her husband was before her, and catching her by the arm, held her tightly.

"What are you going to do?" he whispered hoarsely.

"It's my boy; it's Herbert!" she cried, struggling mechanically. "I forgot it was two miles away. What are you holding me for? Let go. I must open the door."

"For God's sake don't let it in," cried the old man, trembling.

"You're afraid of your own son," she cried, struggling. "Let me go. I'm coming, Herbert; I'm coming."

There was another knock, and another. The old woman with a sudden wrench broke free and ran from the room. Her husband followed to the landing, and called after her appealingly as she hurried downstairs. He heard the chain rattle back and the bolt drawn slowly and stiffly from the socket. Then the old woman’s voice, strained and panting.

"The bolt," she cried loudly. "Come down. I can't reach it."

But her husband was on his hands and knees groping wildly on the floor in search of the paw. If only he could find it before the thing outside got in. A perfect fusillade of knocks reverberated through the house, and he heard the scraping of a chair as his wife put it down in the passage against the door. He heard the creaking of the bolt as it came slowly back, and at the same moment he found the monkey's paw, and frantically breathed his third and last wish.

The knocking ceased suddenly, although the echoes of it were still in the house. He heard the chair drawn back, and the door opened. A cold wind rushed up the staircase, and a long loud wail of disappointment and misery from his wife gave him the courage to run down to her side, and then to the gate beyond. The street lamp flickering opposite shone on a quiet and deserted road.

Science

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Mr. Gjefle

tgjefle@swsd101.org

M-F 10am-11am

Ms. Eide

keide@swsd101.org

M-F 10am - 11am

Mr.Fairbank

fafairbank@swsd.org 

M-F 10am - 11am

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.

Week 3: Weather Final Model

DIRECTION PAGE

This week you will show your understanding of how big hail storms happen. You will use all your resources (readings, lessons from class, the internet, ect.). Think back to what we practiced in class. Use the checklist by checking off each piece as you go (you will address some pieces more than once).

Goal: Show what you know about how hail storms happen. Show how temperature (energy), water, and air interact to create hail storms.

How to complete this task:

Hard Copy (Packet):

Digital: Additional upload instructions are on the online assignment page.

Final Model Directions, Expectation and Starting Example:

Use your resources from the past two weeks of distance learning and what you can remember from class. Please do your best. This will be your only science assignment this week. It should take you an hour to an hour and a half.

Use the Gotta Have It list! Address everything on the list at least once.

Social Studies

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

O’Reilly

aoreilly@swsd101.org

Monday-Friday

10:00-11:00 AM

Swatzina

gswatzina@swsd101.org

9-10am daily for phone/zoom

Available M-F via email

Unavailable April 6-10

Lewis

rlewis@swsd101.org

Monday-Wednesday 1-2:45, limited availability 4/20-4/28 on family medical leave

Garlatz

kgarlatz@swsd101.org

9:30-10:30 Monday-Friday

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.

What is worth fighting for?

Imagine that beings from another planet have come to Earth. The beings have come to teach Earthlings a “better” way to live. This “better” way to live does not allow for your traditions, beliefs, or even favorite activities. Half of the people that you know have become ill since the beings have arrived.

Write about one of the traditions, beliefs or activities that you would be willing to fight for. Tell why this tradition, belief, or activity is important to you and why you would be willing to fight for it.

Use the space below to write a paragraph response to the prompt. This would be a great opportunity to practice your framework paragraph!

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Washington Journey Textbook  Pages 84-87

The Treaty-Making Period

Key Ideas:

Key Terms:

Assimilation:  the act of accepting a new culture

Council:  a group of people called together for a specific purpose

Infringe:  to violate or break a rule, law, or policy

Paternal:  fatherly; characteristic of a father

Relinquish:  to give up

Reservation:  land set aside for Native Americans

Sovereign:  the status of having power or authority; self-governing or independent

Stipulate:  to require or specify as a condition of an agreement

Superiority:  the quality, condition, or belief of being higher or more important than another

Treaty:  a formal agreement between two or more independent nations

A Changing Relationship

When sea traders, fur trappers, and missionaries first came to the Pacific Northwest, Indians were willing to trade with them, and most got along well.  Indians worked for the fur companies and helped missionaries build homes and churches.  As  you read in chapter 2, Native aAmericans helped Lewis and Clark in their journey through the Northwest.  However, as thousands of settlers came west on the Oregon Trail, relations between Indians and whites changed.  

        As pioneers moved west, thousands of oxen, mules, and horses followed, grazing their way west.  They often spread out for a mile or more beside the wagons.  So many animals passed through each summer that watering holes were drained by heavy use.  Natural grasslands were depleted, so wild animals had trouble finding food.  Always looking for fresh meat, the travelers hunted along the way.  This meant that the supply of deer, eld, and buffalo that Indians relied on for food dwindled.

        Pioneers observed Indians and wrote about them in diaries.  A woman named Catherine Washburn observed: “Indians ketch crickets and dry them, pound to powder, mix with berries, and bake it for bread.

        The dwindling food resources as well as disease took a toll on the Indian population.  And, as more whites settled in the territory, there was a conflict over land ownership.  The changes brought by settlers and the increasing conflict sparked an era of warfare that lasted 30 years.

Cultural Conflict

Why were there so many problems? Why couldn’t both groups live side by side in the vast territory?

The Cayuse War

The Whitman Tragedy marked the beginning of a bloody period in relations between white settlers and native peoples.  The murder of Dr. Whitman, his wife, and 12 others at the Waiilatpu mission sparked the Cayuse War.  Settlers organized a volunteer militia and asked assistance from Washington, D.C.  Over the next several years, Cayuse Indians battled with local militia and U.S. troops.

In an effort to end the violence, a Cayuse chief ordered five warriors to surrender to U.S. troops for the murder of the Whitmans.  The warriors were hanged, but the violence continued.  By 1855, the Cayuse were defeated.  Those who survived were placed on a reservation (land set aside for Native Americans).  

What Do You Think?  

White settlers and Native Americans were both guilty of savage cruelty.  Some history books, however, have presented a skewed account of the conflicts. When whites slaughtered Indians, the conflict was usually a “battle,” but when Indians slaughtered whites, it was a “massacre.”  What do you think is the reasoning behind these work choices?

What is a Treaty?

A treaty is a written agreement between two states or sovereigns (independent nations).  The federal government considered native groups living in the United States and its territories to be sovereign nations.  According to the U.S. constitution, the federal government has the responsibility of negotiating treaties with other nations. As an agent of the U.S. government, that’s exactly what Governor Stevens was doing - negotiating agreements with Indians nations.

        The United States signed about 800 treaties with Native Americans between 1789 and 1871, although less than half were approved by Congress.  This made treaty enforcement difficult.  All of the Stevens Treaties, however, were among those approved by Congress.  Nevertheless, misunderstandings and disagreements over treaty terms continue to this day.

The Stevens Treaties

The murders of the Whitmans sparked the Cayuse War between the Cayuse people and the white settlers backed by the U.S. Army.  It would not be the only war, however.  In an effort to address the increasing tension between white settlers and native peoples, Washington’s newly appointed governor, Isaac Stevens, embarked on a tour of the territory and held meetings with representatives of the largest Indian groups.  In just over a year, Stevens signed10 treaties (agreements between two or more independent nations) that resulted in the relinquishing (giving up) of Indian lands.  By signing the treaties, Indians agreed to move to reservations.  On the reservations, native groups would be concentrated in much smaller and less desirable lands.

        The treaties also specified that on some reservations free agricultural and industrial schools would be established to teach Indian children the values and practices of white society. On the reservation, Indians also would have free access to health care.  Their benefits would be available for up to 20 years in most cases.  

        The treaties that Stevens negotiated were an example of the mindset of many Americans at the time.  They reflected a belief in manifest destiny as well as the paternal (fatherly) attitude that many Americns had toward the Indians.  The government thought that moving th eIndians to reservations would protect them from white settlement and encourage them to adopt the beliefs and habits of whitle society.

The great end to be looked to is the gradual civilization of the Indians, and the ultimate incorporation with the people of the Territory. - Governor Issac Stevnes

The idea of assimilation (the act of accepting a new culture) was the cornerstone of Indian policy throughout the 19th century.  Native Americans paid a heavy price for this policy, as it not only took away their land, but it chipped away at their cultural traditions and practices

Broken Promises

The treaties made some promises to the native peoples, but often the terms of the treaties were either broken or only partially fulfilled.  Additionally, treaty terms were open to interpretation and revised when the needs of white settlers changed.

        Although the Indians were to be paid for their land, they were often paid very little and sometimes not at all. The money that was promised would be divided into payment spread over a period of years.  The president of the United States would retain the right to dispense the money as he saw fit.

        For example, the Treaty of Point No Point promised to pay natives of “said tribes and bands the sum of sixty thousand dollars” over a period of 20 years. The treaty further stipulated that:

All which said sums of money shall be applied to the use and benefit of the said Indians under the direction of the President of the United States, who may from time to time determine at his discretion upon what beneficial object to expend the same.

False Assumptions

The languages of the negotiations and the treaties could be confusing.  Stevens and other U.S. officials did not speak native languages, and the natives spoke little or not English.  The language used was something in between called Chinook Jargon. It had only 500 words, which made negotiating more difficult.  Despite the trouble communicating, Stevens made his message clear: U.S. government officials wanted Indian land for settlers, and they wanted the Indians to live on smaller areas of land called reservations

        Not only did the Indians have to give up their lands, but some were also assigned to share reservations with other tribes that were their enemies.  Government representatives ignored this issue.  What’s more, officials did not recognize that the changes they wanted would be harder on some tribes than on others.  Coastal Indians would be able to continue living and fishing on the coast, so their way of life would not change very much.  But Indians who lived inland on the plateau were faced with significant changes to the way they lived.  They needed plenty of space to hunt animals and gather seasonal plants. This would not be possible on the small reservations.

What Did You Learn?

  1. What was the purpose of the treaties between the United States government and the Indians?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. What problems resulted from broken promises and false assumptions?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Explain how the treaties represented American attitudes about Indians at the time.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Carlson, L. M., Green, M. K., & Kerwin, C. S. (2010). The Washington journey. Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

Wellness

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Joana Michaelson

jmichaelson@swsd101.org

10:00-11:00am

(unavailable April 6-10)

Gibran Smith

gsmith@swsd101.org

10:00-11:00am

Brenna Zavala

bzavala@swsd101.org

11:00-12:00

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.

 How to turn in assignments/work:

Packet Instructions:

        GOAL: Get 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day!

1) Complete a workout that is challenging for you every day! You can use the one I have provided, or find your own online work-out, go for a run, or make up your own.

  1. Do 2-3 sets of each workout, be sure to rest 1-2 minutes between each set.
  1. 1 set = completing all exercises listed

2) Write it down in your weekly activity log: Be sure to list all the ways you have been physically active during each day, trying to get at least 30 minutes a day!

 


Monday April 20th

GOAL: Get 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day!

1) Complete a workout that is challenging for you every day! You can use the one I have provided, or find your own online work-out, go for a run, or make up your own.

2) Write it down in your weekly activity log: Be sure to list all the ways you have been physically active during each day, trying to get at least 30 minutes a day!

Workout: High Intensity Interval Training or HIIT Workout

Directions: Complete each of the exercises below for 30 seconds, followed by 15 seconds of rest. Complete 2 sets - 1 set is doing all 8 exercises,  2 sets = 12 minute HIIT workout.

Equipment: Timer (Watch, phone, computer, cooking timer, etc) If you can’t find a timer just do 20 reps of each exercise. Oh and good music of your choice makes it more fun!

  1. Jumping Jacks - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  2. Mountain Climbers - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  3. Squats - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  4. Leg Extension/Crunches - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  5. Push-ups - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  6. High Knees Jog in Place - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  7. Burpees - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  8. Plank up-downs/Shoulder Taps - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

*Rest 1 minute before starting the 2nd set.

*If you want to follow this workout online with me leading the exercises go to:

 https://youtu.be/jWuISJQ7Za4


Tuesday April 21st

GOAL: Get 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day!                                         1) Complete a workout that is challenging for you every day! You can use the one I have provided, or find your own online work-out, go for a run, or make up your own exercises.

 2) Write it down in your weekly activity log: Be sure to list all the ways you have been physically active during each day, trying to get at least 30 minutes a day!

Workout: Try to get to Level 1 of Prime and complete 3 sets of this Prime workout!


Wednesday April 22nd

GOAL: Get 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day!

1) Complete a workout that is challenging for you every day! You can use the one I have provided,find your own online work-out, go for a run, or make up your own.

2) Write it down in your weekly activity log: Be sure to list all the ways you have been physically active during each day, trying to get at least 30 minutes a day!

Workout: High Intensity Interval Training or HIIT Workout

Directions: Complete each of the exercises below for 30 seconds, followed by 15 seconds of rest. Complete 2 sets - 1 set is doing all 8 exercises,  2 sets = 12 minute HIIT workout.

Equipment: Timer (Watch, phone, computer, cooking timer, etc) If you can’t find a timer just do 20 reps of each exercise. Oh and good music of your choice makes it more fun!

  1. Standing Crunches - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-Standing with hands over ears, touch rt. elbow to left knee, repeat alternating arm/legs

  1. Speed Skater Side Jumps - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-Jump side to side landing on one outside leg, letting inside leg swing behind, should like skating

  1. Plank Jacks - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-From push-up position, hop your feet out away from each other, now bring feet back together

  1. Squat Jumps - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-Feet shoulder width apart squat down and jump in the air on way up, landing back into a squat

  1. Plank Jump In/out - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-From push-up position, hop your feet up towards chest, now hop them back to start position

  1. Butt-kickers Jog in Place - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-Kick your feet back as far as possible while jogging in place

  1. Russian Twists - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

-Sitting on floor, lean upper body back, feet off the floor, and hands together twisting side to side

  1. 2 foot hops side to side - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

*Rest 1 minute before starting the 2nd set.

*If you want to follow a similar workout online with Mr. Smith leading the exercises go to: https://youtu.be/cCjs6gvDARU


Thursday April 23

GOAL: Get 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day!                                      1) Complete a workout that is challenging for you every day! You can use the one I have provided, or find your own online work-out, go for a run, or make up your own exercises.

 2) Write it down in your weekly activity log: Be sure to list all the ways you have been physically active during each day, trying to get at least 30 minutes a day!

Workout: Try and complete all 4 sets of this Total Body Workout!


Friday April 24th

Directions: Design your very own HIIT workout by choosing the exercises you want to do. Simply write in the exercises from the bank below or choose your own favorites and write them down in the order you want into the blank spaces next to each number.

Workout: High Intensity Interval Training or HIIT Workout: 

Remember Complete each of the exercises below for 30 seconds, followed by 15 seconds of rest. Complete 2 sets - 1 set is doing all 8 exercises.

Equipment: Timer (Watch, phone, computer, cooking timer, etc) If you can’t find a timer just do 20 reps of each exercise. Oh and good music of your choice makes it more fun!

Exercise Word Bank: jumping jacks, Burpees, push-ups, mountain climbers, squats, squat jumps, squat jacks, lunges, lunge jumps, sit-ups, planks, plank jacks, plank up-downs, plank jump in-out, v-ups, leg extensions, flutter kicks, russian twists, bicycle crunches, Jog in place high knees/butt-kickers, tuck jumps, star jumps, or any other exercise you know and want to do.

*Not sure of the name of an exercise?-just make up your own name.

  1.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  2.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  3.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  4.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  5.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  6.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  7.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest
  8.                                       - 30 seconds/15 seconds Rest

*Rest 1 minute before starting the 2nd set.


CMS Physical Activity Log

GOAL: 30-60 minutes of moderate to intense activity each day!

Directions: Use the chart below to track how much activity you are getting each day, at the end of the week Total your minutes and turn Log back into your teacher with parent signature to verify you completed all activities.

Minimum Requirement: 150 minutes per week to receive PE credit for the week.

Day and

Date

List all Physical Activities and number of minutes doing each.activity.

Total # of Minutes

Ex - Monday

3/30/2020

1. Completed packet workout - 15 min

2. Jumped on Trampoline - 15 min.

3. Played basketball in my driveway - 20 minutes

50 min.

Monday

1.

2.

3.

Tuesday

1.

2.

3.

Wednesday

1.

2.

3.

Thursday

1.

2.

3.

Friday

1.

2.

3.

Saturday

1.

2.

3.

Sunday

1.

2.

3.

*Total- Add up all of your physical activity minutes for the week=        

*Please write your first/last name & Teacher clearly!

Alcohol can rewire the teenage brain

This infographic shows percentages of underage pre-teens and teens that have engaged in drinking alcohol.Image 1. According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), underage drinking accounts for 11 percent of all alcohol use in the United States. Graphic: SAMHSA

By Tara Haelle, Science News for Students

Published:01/29/2020

Alcohol is a drug. And every day, more than 6,500 Americans ages 12 to 17 take their first full drink of this drug. That's according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA. And the problem is not just that this consumption is illegal. Kids who start drinking before age 15 also are more likely to misuse alcohol than are people who wait until adulthood for their first sip. Another big problem for kids who experiment with this drug is that they are more likely than adults are to consume too much alcohol over a short period of time. This is known as binge drinking.

What few people realize is that binge drinking poses many risks that go well beyond getting drunk and acting irresponsibly. That's why an organization of doctors has just issued a new report laying out those risks. It appeared in the August 30 issue of Pediatrics.

Lorena Siqueira is a pediatrician at Florida International University and Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami. She studies teen alcohol use and helped write the new Pediatrics report. "When kids drink, they tend to do heavy drinking," she notes. Unfortunately, she adds, "Their bodies are not ready to handle that kind of alcohol."

Teens Are Most Likely To Binge Drink

Some teens drink because they have low self-esteem or think it will make them feel happier, the new Pediatrics report states. Others are impulsive. They are looking for new experiences. Teens also drink when many of their friends do.

Underage drinking accounts for 11 percent of all the alcohol consumed in the United States, SAMHSA notes. More than one in five kids 12 and younger have consumed alcohol. By high school, two out of three teens have, a new study reports. The problem: Many teens don't stop at a few sips. They binge.

In adults, binge drinking means downing at least four drinks in a row, if you're a woman — five in a row if you're a man. A drink is one beer, one glass of wine or one shot of hard liquor. For adolescents, it takes less alcohol to constitute a binge. Downing just three drinks in a row is binging for boys 9 to 13 or for any girl under 17. Among boys 14 to 15, it's four drinks.

More adults drink alcohol than teens do. But among drinkers, teens are more likely than adults to binge, Siqueira notes. Some 28 to 60 percent of teens who drink report binge drinking, she says. Indeed, 9 out of 10 drinks downed by those under age 21 are in a binge-drinking episode, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.

Teens often start drinking because they are curious and experimenting, Siqueira says. But they tend to drink quickly, "so they take in more than they realize," she says. Not surprisingly, they can get dangerously drunk very fast.

Plus, "The younger they start, the more likely they are to continue to drink and to drink larger amounts," Siqueira says. That occurs even though alcohol has a stronger effect in adolescents than it does in adults. The really sad outcome: Teens who binge drink are more likely to become alcoholics, she reports.

Binge Drinking Is Dangerous

"We live in a world where many adults and some teenagers drink alcohol," says Vivian Faden. She's a scientist at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, or NIAAA, in Rockville, Maryland. "So it is normal to be curious about alcohol," she concedes. But there are good reasons why it makes sense to hold off drinking alcohol "until the teenage years are over," she says.

This infographic shows a bar graph. When teens were asked about the last time they drank, 23.1 percent reported having one drink, 18.1 percent had two drinks, 24.3 percent had three or four drinks, 24 percent had five to eight drinks, and 10.4 percent had nine or more drinks.

Image 2. Teens are more likely than adults to binge drink, or drink too much alcohol over a short period of time. Between 28 and 60 percent of teens who drink report binge drinking. Graphic: SAMHSA

Binge drinking leads people to get very drunk. Normally, the liver helps remove alcohol from the blood. But when the liver cannot keep up, the alcohol then circulates through the bloodstream and brain while waiting to be removed by the liver. This is when a person becomes drunk, a condition known as intoxication. About half of high school seniors have been drunk at least once, according to recent research. Some 10 percent of eighth-graders have too. "When you binge drink, you can get into all kinds of trouble," Siqueira says. Big trouble.

For one, auto accidents. One in every five teen drivers involved in fatal car crashes has alcohol in their bloodstream, according to the CDC. More than 80 percent have blood-alcohol levels above the legal limit for adults. But a teen doesn't have to be behind the wheel for alcohol to pose a grave risk. Teens can get depressed and injure themselves or hurt someone else. They might have sex when they didn't mean to. A teen might black out, forgetting what happened when he or she was drunk. Some teens drink so much that alcohol poisoning stops them from breathing. The risks of teen drinking are so high, Siqueira says, that even a single episode may prove to be one too many.

Long-Term Effects On The Brain

People forget what happens when they are drunk because alcohol makes it harder for the brain to turn short-term memories into long-term ones. But for teens, alcohol's dangers go well beyond impairing memory. A new rodent study finds that alcohol can lead to long-term — and harmful — changes to the brain.

"We used to think that brain development was done by the time you're a teenager," Siqueira says. "Now we know that's not true." The brain keeps developing into a person's 20s and even early 30s, she explains.

In the new study, scientists gave 10 doses of alcohol to adolescent rats over 16 days. The amounts led to blood-alcohol levels that might model a teen who binge drinks. After these exposures, the rats never tasted alcohol again. Later, in adulthood, the scientists attached electrical equipment to a part of each animal's brain. Called the hippocampus, this region controls memory and learning.

Nerve cells in that part of the brain communicated abnormally, the scientists found. The cells also looked more immature than usual. Branches coming off of nerve cells should look like short mushrooms. Instead, here they looked long and thin. Again, this damage showed up in that part of the brain linked with learning and memory.

"For humans, this means binge drinking during adolescence may permanently change brain functioning," says the NIAAA's Faden. What's more, she adds, these changes "appear to be irreversible."

Mary-Louise Risher of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, led that new rodent study. Her team published it in the June issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Other research has shown that teens who drink heavily lose more white matter in their brain over time than do teens who don't, Faden says. White matter acts a bit like the brain's superhighway system. It connects areas of the brain's so-called gray matter, which processes information. The white matter allows messages to shuttle quickly, even over relatively long distances in the brain. Alcohol also can hurt a portion of gray matter in a region known as the prefrontal cortex, Faden says. This area is used for attention, concentration, self-control and making decisions.

Those kinds of skills work together to create what brain scientists refer to as executive function. Poor executive function makes it harder for individuals to control their behavior. And it makes it more difficult for them to stop doing something that could hurt them. A person with poor executive function may be less likely to turn down the chance to drink alcohol or may get behind the wheel of a car when it would be dangerous to drive.

As alcohol makes a teen less likely to turn down alcohol, the risk of binging grows. This drinking can create a cycle of inappropriate behavior. Worst of all, this cycle may lead to alcoholism in some teens, Faden notes. The bottom line, she says: When it comes to the developing adolescent brain, "There is no known safe level of binge drinking."

Quiz: After reading the article take the quiz and circle the correct answer.

1. Which selection from the article is BEST illustrated by Image 1 in the article?

A) Underage drinking accounts for 11 percent of all the alcohol consumed in the United States, SAMHSA notes. More than one in five kids 12 and younger have consumed alcohol. By high school, two out of three teens have, a new study reports. The problem: Many teens don't stop at a few sips. They binge.

B) Teens often start drinking because they are curious and experimenting, Siqueira says. But they tend to drink quickly, "so they take in more than they realize," she says. Not surprisingly, they can get dangerously drunk very fast.

C) Normally, the liver helps remove alcohol from the blood. But when the liver cannot keep up, the alcohol then circulates through the bloodstream and brain while waiting to be removed by the liver. This is when a person becomes drunk, a condition known as intoxication. About half of high school seniors have been drunk at least once, according to recent research. Some 10 percent of eighth-graders have too.

D) Other research has shown that teens who drink heavily lose more white matter in their brain over time than do teens who don't, Faden says. White matter acts a bit like the brain's superhighway system. It connects areas of the brain's so-called gray matter, which processes information.

2. How does Image 2 and the text in the section "Teens Are More Likely To Binge Drink" develop an understanding of alcohol use among young people?

A) The text compares adult binge drinking with underage binge drinking, and the image provides more information about the comparison.

B) The text explains the most common dangers of binge drinking, and the image helps readers understand what percentage of young people have experienced them.

C) The text defines what binge drinking means for both adults and young people, and the image helps readers understand what percentage of young people binge drink.

D) The text provides anecdotes about young people's experiences with binge drinking, and the image helps readers understand what percentage of young people binge drink.

3. Which sentence from the article would be MOST important to include in a summary of the article?

A) Kids who start drinking before age 15 also are more likely to misuse alcohol than are people who wait until adulthood for their first sip.

B) Some teens drink because they have low self-esteem or think it will make them feel happier, the new Pediatrics report states

C) One in every five teen drivers involved in fatal car crashes has alcohol in their bloodstream, according to the CDC.

D) The bottom line, she says: When it comes to the developing adolescent brain, "There is no known safe level of binge drinking."

4. Read the following sentence from the article. Indeed, 9 out of 10 drinks downed by those under age 21 are in a binge-drinking episode, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. How does this detail develop the article's central idea?

A) It emphasizes the fact that underage drinkers are more likely to binge drink than adults.

B) It compares adult binge drinking habits with underage binge drinking habits.

C) It helps explain why binge drinking is so common among underage drinkers.

D) It describes some of the developmental consequences of binge drinking.

Elective

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Brenna Zavala- 7th grade AVID

bzavala@swsd101.org

11:00-12:00

Amy Regehr - Art

aregehr@swsd101.org

10:00-11:00am

Olivia Lenoue-Choir/General Music

olenoue@swsd101.org

M-F 8:00-9:00am

Kyler Brumbaugh - Band

kbrumbaugh@swsd101.org

1:00-2:00

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.

AVID:  Complete College Vocabulary Book

Instructions:

1)  Draw a picture of your dream school’s logo or mascot in the provided box.

2)  Write the definitions for each college term in the boxes

Music Listening Journal                Name:_________

Instructions: actively listen to 5 or more minutes of music every day. Listening should be your primary focus; don’t just turn on music and start doing something else. You can listen to anything you choose, but you are encouraged to listen to things you would not normally listen to (see your teachers’ suggestions). After you listen, write about your thoughts and feelings. Try to answer the leading questions. You may either print this form or keep answers in your own journal. Find the listening suggestions on Youtube.

Monday

April 20

What did you listen to? __________________________

Listening

Suggestions

Brumbaugh: Bend Folds performs Phone in a Pool with yMusic

Lenoue: J'entends le Moulin performed by University of Utah Singers

Weaver:  Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Finale

How are you incorporating music into your life while you’ve been spending time at home?

Your thoughts and feelings: __________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

Tuesday

April 21

What did you listen to? ____________________________

Listening

Suggestions

Brumbaugh: An American Elegy by Frank Ticheli

Lenoue: Fly to Paradise by Eric Whitacre

Weaver: IVAR Acres of Clams

What music have you been listening to that you’ve found comforting during your time at home? Describe why it’s comforting.

Your thoughts and feelings: _________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

Wednesday

April 22

What did you listen to? ____________________________

Listening

Suggestions

Brumbaugh: Feeling Like Funking it Up by Rebirth Brass Band

Lenoue: Take Five-by Dave Brubeck

Weaver:Ding Dong Merrily on High

How did these

musicians get to this level?

How does this music make you feel?

What do you like/not like about this music?

Your thoughts and feelings: _________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

Thursday

April 23

What did you listen to? _____________________________

Listening

Suggestions

Brumbaugh: 3 Things by Jason Mraz

Lenoue: The Long Road by Eddie Vedder/Nusrat Fateh/Ali Khan

Weaver: Vintage Brazil Touch

Have you discovered any new songs or artists lately that have really resonated with you? Who/what are they? Why?

Your thoughts and feelings: _________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

Special Education

Teacher:

Contact:

Office Hours:

Clay Wing

cwing@swsd101.org

Available M-F via email

Linda Longfellow

llongfellow@swsd101.org

Available M-F via email

Office Hours - Time when your teacher will be reading and responding to e-mail messages quickly.