• Sedro-Woolley High School

     

    AP/Pre-AP/Honors Program REQUIREDSummer Reading

     

    SWHS Honors English Program Philosophy:

     

    The purpose of summer reading is not to ruin your summer nor is it intended for turning you into geeks.  Really!  It is to help you to improve your vocabulary, to strengthen your reading skills, and to make you better citizens of the earth. We believe honors students benefit from being exposed to a variety of literature.  The novels selected are quality, literary works that allow students a greater variety of literature from which to draw from when taking the SAT’s, the ACT’s, and the AP exam ultimately. Additionally, the novels serve as a foundational beginning to the courses from which immediate learning is to take place rather than waiting weeks for students to complete the reading. 

     

    Students are tested with an essay and/or multiple-choice exam on the first couple days of the course then used in the class for literary analysis, discussions, and connections to units of study for the course.  This is an initial grade that also allows the teacher to evaluate students as the semester begins.  Students who do NOT complete their required reading begin the semester at a severe disadvantage as they begin each course.

     

     

    1.     Students are encouraged to make post-it notes attached to pages, to create handwritten notes, and to highlight passages in their texts.

     

    2.     Notes may be used on their first day exam and essay.  Teachers have given some guiding areas of interest, but this is not all encompassing.

     

     

    Every student needs to email each person’s  teacher over the summer with any questions and to make contact so that the teacher may make contact with you with any additional information over the summer. 

     

    Pre-AP Honors 9                                              Joni McSpadden                      jmcspadden@swsd.k12.wa.us                              

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    ***It is advised that honors students purchase their own books and feel free then to highlight sections and to make notations in margins for discussion and note purposes.

    ***HOWEVER, if purchasing these books will not be possible or put a strain on the family due to a financial hardship, please see/contact Miss Heffele in A208 or your honors teacher by Friday, June 5. We have copies of the texts and can check them out for the summer.

     

    Book lists will be given to Border’s Express at Cascade Mall, SW Public Library, and Barnes & Noble in Bellingham.  WWU may also have used books at the campus bookstore.

    (Amazon.com also offers new and used books; be ware of shipping fees. For price comparison, Amazon.com prices are noted.)

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    Reference Texts advised for the honors-college bound students:

    A dictionary                            Woe is I (easy grammar reference)

    A thesaurus                             Test of Time (SAT/ACT story-based vocabulary study guide)

     

    Honors English 9

    The Alchemistby Paulo Coehlo (With introduction)        ($3.00 used Amazon.com/$7.08 new Amazon)

     

    “More parable than novel, "The Alchemist" uses the story of young shepherd Santiago's search for his Personal Legend as an allegory for everyman's struggle to break from the comfortable confines of conformity and pursue his life dreams. Along the way, of course, our young everyman is beset by all manner of setbacks, testing his resolve and forcing him to become attuned to the Soul of the World in order to survive. By paying attention to the details in the world around him, which serve as omens guiding him towards his goal, young Santiago becomes an alchemist in his own right, spinning unfavorable circumstances into riches.”—Amazon comment

     

    Things Not Seenby Andrew Clements                ($4.50 used Amazon.com/$8.50 new Amazon)

     

    “Every teenager can remember a time they felt invisible. For fifteen year-old Bobby Phillips of Chicago, life changes dramatically when he wakes up one morning and finds out that he is literally invisible. Clements introduces this conflict on the first page, and instantly draws you in. Bobby knows that because of his newly discovered condition, he can no longer go to school, see his friends, or have any contact with the outside world because of what people will think. Even his physicist father cannot figure out what went wrong. Clements uses the metaphor of teenage invisibility to covey a powerful message: even people who feel invisible can be seen for what they are.” –Amazon comment

     

    Focus your reading on:

    As you read, consider the following.:

    • Do not merely read for comprehension.  Read for deep understanding and metaphorical meaning.
    • How do literary elements (simile, metaphor, personification, oxymoron, etc.) effect your understanding of the text?
    • Focus on character development from the beginning to the end of the novel.
    • How does the setting influence the character, and vice versa?
    • How do the four obstacles (The Alchemist) have a universal application?

     

     

     

    Students are encouraged to make post-it notes attached to pages, to create handwritten notes, and to highlight passages in their texts.

     

    Notes and books may be used on their first day exam and essay.  Teachers have given some guiding areas of interest, but this is not all encompassing.

Last Modified on January 23, 2013