• Mrs. Knight

    Hilary Knight
    Email Me:

    Phone:
    (360) 855-3510 x 4016

     

    General Chemistry
    AP Chemistry

                          


    General Chemistry

     

    Welcome to Chemistry.  Chemistry is made up of two semester long courses that will involve a variety of learning activities from laboratory work to discussion.  Below are some things you’ll need to know to succeed. 
    ·         Topics of Study:  The textbook we will use is Chemistry published by Prentice-Hall.  In an effort to prepare students for Chemistry as undergraduates in college as well as help them to develop analytical and problem solving skills, the course will take a traditional, calculation-based approach to the topic of chemistry.  We will focus on the following topics:

    1.      Atomic Model History:  Dalton; JJ Thompson; Rutherford; Bohr; Schroedinger

    2.       Atomic Model:  protons; neutrons; electrons; atomic mass; isotopes; relative atomic mass; percent composition; the mole.

    3.      Periodic Table:  Bohr Model of Atom; electron affinity and shielding; Periodic Table Trends.

    4.      Bonding:  electron configuration; ions; types of bonds; Lewis Structures of covalent compounds; polar and non-polar bonds.

    5.      Compounds:  Nomenclature, molecular formulas and molecular mass

    6.      Metric system; significant figures; unit conversions; solving for an unknown

    7.      Chemical Reactions:  classification; writing and balancing chemical reactions; stoichiometry; limiting reactant.

    8.      Solutions: intermolecular forces; solubility; solution energetics; colligative properties; solution stoichiometry; molarity, molality and % by mass.

    9.      Gases: Boyle’s and Charles’ Law; Ideal Gas Law; gas stoichiometry

    10. Thermodynamics: calories, phase changes: heat of fusion/vaporization; heat of solution; Hess’ Law; entropy and free energy.

    11.  Equilibrium:  Law of Mass Action; Keq; Acid / Base equilibrium


     


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Last Modified on March 20, 2008